Posts Tagged ‘Valkyrie’

New Video about the EVGT-40

EVTV | Posted by admin May 9th, 2011

This video segment was produced for Jack Rickards EVTV.

The video was shot and edited on an iPhone 4 and iPad.

Wheels

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin May 22nd, 2009

My vision was for the car to have modern looking wheels with 19″ rims and thin tires similiar to a Corvette. A friend has a great set of rims and tires he was willing to sell me that would be perfect. But I quickly ran into problems. Though they were 5 bolt, the bolt pattern was wrong. The Corvair has a 5 bolt 4.75″ pattern and even though these had come off a Pontiac, they were a 410mm. Further checking, and learning turned up that the Corvair suspension is designed for a 4.5″ back spacing and 0 offset. Most cool new rims are 7.5″ back spacing and a 55mm offset. (not sure why offset always seems to be specified in metric and backspacing in inches).

I have looked at wheels that would fit this backspacing and most look vintage. I really would like the wheels to look more modern. They do make adapters but I have heard mixed advice on using these. Though my friends Porsche came from the factory with spacers already installed so they can’t be all bad. But they do have to be machined right.

Reshaping the tail end

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin March 25th, 2009

The original Valkyrie had a rounded back end. This rounded shape was by far the worst part of the car. The best discription I have for it was a “duck ass”. It has to go. The plan is to widen the back, lessen the curve, add a bumper, and skirts over the wheel wells.

Out of the garage

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin March 23rd, 2009

Parts For Sale

Uncategorized | Posted by admin March 9th, 2009

Parts For Sale

Mustang or Falcon door handles

$10 plus shipping


These handles are in good condition but should be re-chromed for show quality.

1968 Ford LTD 4 Door Side Front Side Glass – left and right. Perfect for use on a Fiberfab Valkyrie. In perfect condition.

SOLD


Ford Mustang Side windows – Perfect for use in a Fiberfab Valkyrie
SOLD


VW Gia regulators and glass clips.
$65 plus shipping
SOLD

Door hinge set taken off a Fiberfab Valyrie – were replaced with Lambo hinges.

SOLD

Connecting the Motor

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin December 3rd, 2008

Connecting the electric motor to the Corvair transmission has required a lot of thought. My first reaction to the fly wheel and clutch plates when we took off the motor was that they added a lot of weight and were they needed in an EV. If you aren’t aware, any weight that is spinning in a vehicle does a lot to reduce acceleration. Eliminating a pound of spinning weight is like removing 3 pounds of normal weight so having this big flywheel and clutch in the car was a lot of weight that could be removed. Since an electric motor comes to a complete stop when the power is removed, you don’t have to disconnect it like you do an gas engine which continues to spin even when it idles. After talking to some of the guys at the local EAA club I decided that I was going to eliminate the clutch all together. The reality is that my math shows that almost 90% of my normal driving can be done entirely in 2nd gear. Only on the highway would I need to shift to 3rd and only if I wanted to really fly would I go to fourth.

The Warp 9 motor has a keyed 1.125″ shaft that needs to be connected to the shaft of the transmission. Looking at the clutch, I want to keep the springed system that it uses for dampening the shock. I designed an adapter that would allow me to bolt the inner part of the clutch plate to an adapter that would slip on the keyed shaft of the Warp 9 motor. The motor also has a threaded hole on the end that will allow me to bolt this adapter in place so it doesn’t slip off. I also wanted to eliminate the bell housing since doing so allowed me to drop 4 more batteries in, 2 on each side of the transmission.

Sketch of how it should go together

Sketch of how it should go together

Cross section sketch of the adapter

Cross section sketch of the adapter

Motor mount and clutch plate adapter

Motor mount and clutch plate adapter

clutch plate adapter - motor end

clutch plate adapter - motor end

The clutch plate adapter will allow the clutch plate with the removed friction plates to mount to the electric motor shaft.

This is a photo of the shaft with the clutch plate slid onto it.

This is the clutch plate with the unneeded material removed.

The Interior- Seats

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin December 2nd, 2008

Today I went and picked up my wife at the airport. She was returning from visiting my father in law in South America. When she left she took with her the patterns for the car seats she and I had worked out. While she was there she and my father in law took the patterns to some local shops and had the seat covers made. I was excited to see the final product. Custom fit and professional. They need to be stretched and tacked onto the seat foam, but I had to see how they were going to look in the car. Special thanks to my father in law for his help.

Batteries and Battery Racks

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 30th, 2008

One of the hardest tasks when designing an electric car is to decide on the battery pack. The batteries you choose are going to be the heart and blood of your car. Which ones you choose and how many of them you use will determine how fast the car will be and how far it will go.

There are a number of technologies available. Each has it’s advantages and disadvantages.

Lets start by saying what is required is what is called a “deep cycle” battery. These are batteries which can be discharged to within 25% of their power without damaging them. A typical car starter battery is not designed to do this. Deep cycle batteries are used for marine applications like trolling motors or golf cart batteries.

There are 3 types of batteries I considered for my project.

1. Wet Lead Acid – This is your standard car battery or golf cart battery. They are made of plates of lead immersed in an acid. They are cheap, easy to obtain, are reliable, and not easily damaged with charging. The down side is they are heavy, require adding water to the cells every now and then, and they must be kept upright so they don’t spill acid.

2. AGM – Absorbed Glass Mat batteries also use lead and acid, but the the acid is absorbed into a glass fabric so the acid doesn’t spill. These batteries are also typically sealed and do not require maintenance. Because the acid in embedded in the glass mat, they can not spill acid and can be used on thier side or even upside down. The disadvantage is that you must be very carefull not to over charge them. Doing so will damage the battery.

3. Lithium-ion polymer batteries – These batteries are an evolution of the standard laptop battery. They can be quickly charged, are light weight, and hold a lot of energy. The major downside to these is that they are still very expensive. Pricing out a battery pack to run the car was going to be between $20-30k. This is the technology I eventually want to run my car on, but it has to wait till the price comes down.

Weighing in price, weight, and size, I have narrowed my choice to either Exide Orbital 34DC 12 volt deep cycle or the Optima D34/78. These batteries have a 10 inch x 7 inch foot print and both about 55ah.

Based on these batteries I have begun designing the battery racks. The frame was modeled up in 3D Studio Max and used as a model for calculating out the battery positions and designing the rack. The rack is designed to not only old the batteries but also keep them from sliding forward in a hard stop or accident.

Frame loaded with 24 batteries

Frame loaded with 24 batteries

Battery Holders are in red.  Note the addition of a roll bar as part of the system

Battery Holders are in red. Note the addition of a roll bar as part of the system

Battery holder Side View

Battery holder Side View

Top View

Top View

Version 2 - Holds up to 24 batteries

Version 2 - Holds up to 24 batteries

Version 2 Racks

Version 2 Racks

Side View

Side View

Notes:

The electric motor is massed out in purple in these renderings. The transmission is in dark grey. The existing frame is in blue.

The frame is fabricated with 3 types of members, the roll bar is 2″ x .095″ tubular steel, the racks are fabricated from 2″ x .25 angle and 1″ x .125″ angle. Bolt plates are made from .25″ steel plate. The frames are all MIG welded.

Body Work

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 28th, 2008

Fixing the body.

The iPhone

technology | Posted by admin November 23rd, 2008

Just a note about the iPhone. This has been one of my most used tools in this project. The whole project actually started when I was sitting on the beach in Sarasota watching the sunset and surfing on eBay with my iPhone. It was then that I came across the Fiberfab Valkyrie that was for sale in Jupiter, Florida. That dream of taking on Detroit and Tesla and building a cool electric sports car for less took hold of me. One press of the bid now button and the journey began.

Since that time I have used the phone to take photos of what I was doing and email them to friends or experts to get advise or find parts. Without this ability to snap quick photos and carry them easily around the job would be much harder. It is very hard to explain to an autoparts employee what you need without a make and model for a car. But I would pull out my iPhone and show them the project and exactly where the part was going or what it was replacing.

And this blog has been written almost entirely with my iPhone.

The Doors

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 23rd, 2008

Like every part on this car, the doors are not going to be easy. The original manual calls for 1965 Mustang corner windows and a Ford LTD 4dr hardtop side windows. The car I purchased came with the corner windows but no LTD windows. That is going to require some searching. The latches were only partially installed and I don’t like the job he did.

The first part of the job was cleaning up the door handles.  They are handles off of a what appears to be a 1965 Ford Falcon. The previous owner had put masking tape on them and left it on.  I am not sure how old this tape was, but it was baked on good.  2 or three layers worth.  The latches were also a bit rusty and needed a good cleaning.

Here it is all cleaned up.

This latch was mounted, but it needed to come off and all of the rust removed.

The trianglular vent windows had also been covered in layers of masking tape that was baked on.  These took a while to clean up.

After quite a bit of work adjusting and working on the latch and connecting rods, the handles and latches were now mounted and working properly.  I still need locks though.

The Motor

Electronics | Posted by admin November 17th, 2008

The motor for the car is a Warp 9 DC motor. At a hundred twenty five pounds this motor is a little power house.

It is a 9.25″ diameter, series wound DC motor with a double ended shaft.

Standard Features

  • 9.25” diameter, series wound DC motor
  • Weight, approx. 156 pounds
  • 32.3 HP (72 Volts, 335 Amps)*
  • 70 Ft. pounds torque*
  • 5,500 RPM’s
  • Double or single ended shafts
  • Advanced timing – factory set for CCWDE (CWDE available)
  • Industry standard mounting and bolt configuration
  • Commutators key locked onto the shaft
  • High quality, large style brushes, factory preseated over 90%
  • Exceeds Class “H” insulation
  • Drive and tail shafts keyed with pilot bearing hole
  • Delivery – from stock

Brakes

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 17th, 2008

Upgrading the front drum brakes to disc and installing a dual master cylinder and booster. The booster will be powered by an electric vacuum pump.

The front drum brakes were converted to disc brakes for added stopping power. This was easily done with a conversion kit.

The rear brakes are the original Corvair drum brakes.

An emergency brake handle was found at the junk yard that works perfectly. I fabricated a peice of steel plate which bolts to the frame to hold the brake.

The emergency brake uses two cables which come off of the brake handle and go to the back brakes.

The local U-Pull-It junkyard is a great source for parts. In this case, I found an older model Camero with a perfect dual master cylinder and proportioning valve system for the car.

A special mount had to be made to mount the cylinder so it would angle slightly to miss the nostrels and also align with the brake pedals properly.

Here the plumbing for the breaks has been installed. The local NAPA autoparts store was terrific in helping me with this part. My thanks to the guys there. They supplied me with a special kit which included a special tubing that was bendable by hand but rated for high pressure brake lines. This saved a lot of time and was a lot easier that bending steel tubing. The kit also came with all the fittings.


The interior

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 17th, 2008

Designing the interior.

Transmission

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 17th, 2008

Transmission and linkage.

Rebuilding the front end

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 16th, 2008

The front end suspension on this car is from a 1967 Corvair. When I purchased the car, the front end was completely rusted out. The cross member was rusted completely through and lacked any structural integrity.

Corvair front end rusted out.

Corvair front end rusted out.

Rusted!!

Rusted!!

Taken completely apart and inspected. Some parts could be restored.

Taken completely apart and inspected. Some parts could be restored.

Sandblasted, rustproofed, and painted.

Sandblasted, rustproofed, and painted.

A new cross member was purchased from Clark’s Corvair which was frieghted to me. Though covered with light surface rust, the new cross member was in good shape. A quick sandblasting, rustproofing, and paint and I was ready to assemble all the parts back together.

The steel had arrived for the front nose as well. After carefully measuring and leveling, the new steel was welded into place. A new support for the rack and pinion was also fabricated.

The next step was to mount the fiberglass nose of the car. I was going to fabricate some hinges but needed a good firm mounting point. To do this I would attach two steel plates that I could weld the hinge onto.

The final hinge welded and mounted in place.



The front nose now hinged forward.

The back hinge I also had to fabricate.


Preparing the frame

Restoring and Building | Posted by admin November 16th, 2008

When I recieved the car it had been sitting outside in the elements for a number of years.  The frame hadn’t been properly rust proofed so it was in bad shape.  Once all the suspension and transmission had been removed, the body was lifted off so the work could begin.

The Frame with the body removed.

The Frame with the body removed.

The frame showing the rust

The frame showing the rust

The frame was flipped over to get the underside.

The frame was flipped over to get the underside.

This section was rusted out.  The rusted metal was cut out an new steel was welded in.

This section was rusted out. The rusted metal was cut out an new steel was welded in.

The section removed and remaining metal rust proofed.

The section removed and remaining metal rust proofed.

New metal tack welded in.

New metal tack welded in.

The new metal welded into place.

The new metal welded into place.

This process of replacing metal was repeated on a few other sections that needed to be replaced.

Painted silver.  I debated the frame black, but wanted a higher tech look.

Painted silver. I debated the frame black, but wanted a higher tech look.

The frame was finished except the front nose.  Th metal there was really rusted and the welds done by the previous owner looked horrible.  I had ordered a couple of new pieces of steel that I would weld in there.

Almost finished but right side up.

Almost finished but right side up.

Removing the Engine

Restoring and Building | Posted by Andrew September 2nd, 2008

The first step is to take the car apart and remove any rust from the frame and get the suspension and brakes working.

But before I start that, the engine needs to go. This will lighten up the car and make it easier to work on.
Rolling the car in and out of the garage right now is really hard. I think the front left brakes are locking up.

Here are some photos so you can see what I am starting with. A lot of work.

Getting rid of un-needed ICE (internal combustion engine) parts.

Once the engine is gone there will be plenty of room for batteries.

The back glass was carefully removed and stored in a safe place so it won’t get broken.

The engine is hooked up to the hoist and bolts removed. Ready for removal.

The fly wheel, clutch and pressure plate are removed. These are going to be needed and will have to be adapted to mate to the electric motor.

Special thanks to my friend Tom for helping me remove the engine. The engine was rusted solid so its next home will be a scrap metal yard.

The frame is rolled back into the garage. The next step is removing the transmission and suspension so the frame can be cleaned of rust and the bad areas cut out and replaced.